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LIBERIA RESTORATION PARTY

" Providing leadership to restore Liberia"

Restoration Metaphor

Restoration thrives on ideals that express themselves through selective metaphors. The restoration metaphor does not particularly rest on constructing a house or structure as it does on a renewal process. The nation has a foundation and superstructure. Perhaps cracks in the superstructure go right down to its foundation. But we are not about breaking down the house to its foundation. We are about mending diligently its brokenness and nursing tenderly its bruises. Restorers are people who also participate in the restoration process as actors. They receive and give what restores other people and themselves. Restoration is change—healthy transformation. It is giving back what was taken away or what was damaged. That change does not always imply a new entity, but a degree of newness  in mind, either in content, process or both. That is why we will not debate into oblivion that restoration is significant. But in restoring we will also transform because building on what the forefathers established is pivotal to shaping our destiny. We will not deviate from the foundation they laid, but will shape the structure on it to fit present realities and remain sensitive to the future.

Core Values

These core values shall guide the Liberia Reformation Party in conduct and business.

 

1.Servant-leadership:

We have known “lordship” leadership where leaders are lords over their subjects. They drive them, they rule over them and exercise authority with force and might and they brew fear and insecurity in their following.The leaders thrive on their creation and so rule over their people. We wish to restore true leadership by introducing servant-leadership. This is leadership in which leaders lead primarily by serving their people and considering themselves as servants of a greater Master. They see themselves as servants of other servants and lead by example.

2. Integrity:

Saying to people what one does not intend to do is simply lying and is no politics. Not being what one says she is, is pretense, not politics. Integrity is being truthful, faithful and standing tall when everyone expects you to stand low or fall. Leaders with integrity are those we seek and desire to serve the nation.

 

4. Honesty:

That those seeking restoration strive to live an honest life wherever they are.

5. Social contract:

This contract with public office holders will require them to sign a waiver of their constitutional immunities that prohibit them from being prosecuted while serving their office terms.

6. Transparency:

Where there are always skeletons to hide and businesses to conduct under dark clouds, there is likely to be mistrust, suspicion and dissatisfaction. We wish to restore transparency in our business dealings.

7. People-oriented:

 Many organizations in Liberia form around an individual rather than an ideal. While we realize that one births a vision and few work it out, bearing that vision involves many, many people. We wish to build a political institution around the people and for their sake. As such, the people shall own this party and support it with all their might and means. It belongs to them.

Our Aspiration

The Liberian people deserve a government that loves them, cherishes them, values their views and concerns, engages them constructively to chart their development meaningfully and governs them well through establishing, operating and maintain healthy and good governance structures. They deserve to live happily and be satisfied with the fruit of their labors. Their children deserve to be given a chance at live not because they come from particular backgrounds, but because they are primarily Liberians. We aspire to work together with them so that we all can live our individual and collective dreams in keeping with good conscience and the law of life. To restore Liberia, we wish to move from thinking of politics as political party activity only, to politics as social practice. That means, the people and their public servants will engage the political process even when there are no active political elections or seasons because all seasons are times to restore and renew. Families, marketers, students, workers, worshipers and everyone will own the political process and support it with their might and means. Liberia has become a country where people depend on few political and financial giants around whom the political coordinates revolve. We want politics to be everyone’s business in a real way, although those responsible to lead the process will not leave it to everyone.

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Welcome to the homepage of the Liberia Restoration Party, a party birth forth by the yearning desire of men and women of noble character resolved to see Liberia restored to those principles and value system ordained by God and nurtured by our  founding  fathers and mothers of this once great nation; a nation that feared God above all and loved mankind below. Our desire is to make realistic the promise of "Equal opportunities for all citizens'," a clause wonderfully coined in the letters of our Constitution, irrespective of gender, creed, language, education, social status and/or religion. We endeavor to live in a  nation led by a Christ-styled  leader-servant government that is be responsible, honest, patriotic, God-focused and people centered among others. 

Fundamentally, we are a group of  God fearing men and women who have grown tired of taking the back seat and of rhetorical politics with no substance; from being mere spectators while men and women with less noble character plunge this country in disaster. This we think is because of our lay back approach, wrongly assuming  that God created the world but did not create politics for everyone.  Thankfully, with God on our side as our ultimate remedy, we have come together to make real  our constitutional rights by resolving to become key player in the coming 2017 general and presidential elections. Our principle desire, to begin with, is to groom God-fearing  leaders of all class who, in addition to being capable and responsible stewards, will be accountable to the people over whom they rule, administering effective leadership. 

To this urgent and noble cause we invite all peaceful and God-fearing Liberians to stand with us in  rescuing our nation Liberia from further ruination. And for the sincere love of humanity and the One and Only who is above all, we ask all like minded Liberians and sympathizers living in and out of this country to join us in making a difference  now and forever.

We want to help transform a land that savagely devours its inhabitants into one that develops them and gives them hope for their future. We desire to raise restorers in the family, in education, in industry, in agriculture, in commerce, in health, in media, in the judiciary and in the public space without necessarily being the ones to lead. And if this nation of ours will rise, and if it will rise to the joy of its Creator, then its restorers must rouse and arm themselves with the highest standards and character that accords with His precepts. And if Liberia must also live abundantly, its restorers must abandon themselves to watchful, not wasteful living and seek the abundance, not the abhorrence of their fellow citizens. To this urgent call and noble cause we invite all to stand with us in diligently seeking the restoration of our hurting nation from further ruination. To that effect, and for the sincere love of humanity and the One and Only who is above all, we humbly advance the following framework and principles of governance that we believe will lead to the restoration of Liberia.

The vision of the founding fathers seems to be dying in the bosom of their distant posterity who seem more bent on using government as a vehicle to slam down the very people they were meant to serve, guide, lead and develop.

Growing lawlessness in spite of laws, abject poverty in the midst of obvious plenty, ludicrous living before gullible people, declining standards and deplorable conditions and above all, a disillusioned population—these, we admit, do not reflect the vision of the founding fathers, nor do they represent the values for which some of them proudly sacrificed their lives.

 

Governments have risen and fallen then and now. Political parties have come and gone with no trace, all ostensibly desiring to find a lasting solution by governing the nation exclusively as Head, and in ways and manners that fit their own philosophy, an egocentric philosophy.

General overview

Our country is moving fast into its second century with little specific focus, direction, purpose, collective short and long-term goals and objectives.1 In spite of its age, our nation remains lamentably young in human and infrastructure development. It is unbelievably retarded and immature regarding what it ought to have matured in by now, is hopelessly confused about its identity, cultural and traditional heritage and melancholically impoverished in spite of vast natural resources that abundantly endow it. Why is that so? Partly because of a lingering unpatriotic and destructive culture of corruption and impunity that it has groomed and which its leaders less noble in character, morals and vision embody.


People by nature need order, and that order requires proper structures and policies that ensure it; this structure or framework is government. And there being many forms of governments the world over, we have chosen to walk in the paths of democracy, a democracy that is not limited by any man’s rhetorical definition, but as divinely defined and designed by the Creator and Sustainer of life Himself and upheld by people once entrusted to lay the foundations of this dear nation. Lamentably however, what we have not properly understood and worked towards is our understanding and application of democracy as originally envisioned by our predecessors—that “Liberian Democracy,” what it was, how it should be, in whose interest and who should be its servants in leading its people to peace and prosperity.

At birth, our country had sublime visions of the glorious nation it would become. Our founding fathers and mothers encapsulated some of that vision in what we proudly refer to today as our National Seal. They were determined to build a nation that would make significant difference in Africa, and yes—the world; a nation, though new and inexperienced but nevertheless mighty; though weak, yet strengthened by faith; though small in number and size yet courageous about greatness. They desired to build a nation that rested on faith in God alone, the Christian God and His word; the diligent use of their minds and hands as they kept the inspiring vision of a verdant country with virtuous people before their eyes.


The nation they hoped to build was one whose people would learn, work hard, appreciate and use their minds keenly to develop requisite physical and mental skills to lead it into development and prosperity. They wished to create a nation where peace would reign perpetually and people live together securely. There, their might and means would combine diligently in appropriate proportions to produce what they desperately desired for themselves and their posterity. On the African continent, they, though small and weak, did not think they would always remain marginalized by their size and condition. They hoped to lead the continent in significant ways that reflected their collective vision, but these they could not achieve successfully in the absence of government—good government. So they set themselves at a point to learn the art and skill of self-governance, and although successive governments strived to perfect that art and skill further, our country is still wobbling like a cart wagon with uneven wheels being pulled by an unwilling horse a hundred and sixty-eight years later. Decades of self-governance continue to leave us wondering if we ever truly set our hearts on self-governance.

The vision of the founding fathers seems to be dying in the bosom of their distant posterity who seem more bent on using government as a vehicle to slam down the very people they were meant to serve, guide, lead and develop.Growing lawlessness in spite of laws, abject poverty in the midst of obvious plenty, ludicrous living before gullible people, declining standards and deplorable conditions and above all, a disillusioned population—these, we admit, do not reflect the vision of the founding fathers, nor do they represent the values for which some of them proudly sacrificed their lives.

Governments have risen and fallen then and now. Political parties have come and gone with no trace, all ostensibly desiring to find a lasting solution by governing the nation exclusively as Head, and in ways and manners that fit their own philosophy, an egocentric philosophy.

 

At birth, our country had sublime visions of the glorious nation it would become. Our founding fathers and mothers encapsulated some of that vision in what we proudly refer to today as our National Seal. They were determined to build a nation that would make significant difference in Africa, and yes—the world; a nation, though new and inexperienced but nevertheless mighty; though weak, yet strengthened by faith; though small in number and size yet courageous about greatness. They desired to build a nation that rested on faith in God alone, the Christian God and His word; the diligent use of their minds and hands as they kept the inspiring vision of a verdant country with virtuous people before their eyes.


The nation they hoped to build was one whose people would learn, work hard, appreciate and use their minds keenly to develop requisite physical and mental skills to lead it into development and prosperity. They wished to create a nation where peace would reign perpetually and people live together securely. There, their might and means would combine diligently in appropriate proportions to produce what they desperately desired for themselves and their posterity. On the African continent, they, though small and weak, did not think they would always remain marginalized by their size and condition. They hoped to lead the continent in significant ways that reflected their collective vision, but these they could not achieve successfully in the absence of government—good government. So they set themselves at a point to learn the art and skill of self-governance, and although successive governments strived to perfect that art and skill further, our country is still wobbling like a cart wagon with uneven wheels being pulled by an unwilling horse a hundred and sixty-eight years later. Decades of self-governance continue to leave us wondering if we ever truly set our hearts on self-governance.

The vision of the founding fathers seems to be dying in the bosom of their distant posterity who seem more bent on using government as a vehicle to slam down the very people they were meant to serve, guide, lead and develop.Growing lawlessness in spite of laws, abject poverty in the midst of obvious plenty, ludicrous living before gullible people, declining standards and deplorable conditions and above all, a disillusioned population—these, we admit, do not reflect the vision of the founding fathers, nor do they represent the values for which some of them proudly sacrificed their lives.

Governments have risen and fallen then and now. Political parties have come and gone with no trace, all ostensibly desiring to find a lasting solution by governing the nation exclusively as Head, and in ways and manners that fit their own philosophy, an egocentric philosophy.

 

Our people are forgotten and have become disillusioned by the policies, politics and strategies of governments they help to bring to power repeatedly, but that in no time forget them. So they find it very difficult to trust any political system or party even if it promises them Heaven because they know soon it will give them Hell. Soon it will make them work only for few to spend, they will plant and not harvest and will invent artificial social classes to exclude their children from theirs.

This is why the Liberia Restoration Party, unlike others before it in mindset and philosophy, in structure and manner of thinking, has decided to reassure all citizens and well-wishers of this nation by this single promise: To return a sense of worth to all citizens, especially those socially and economically marginalized. It hopes to guarantee more equitable opportunity for all to share in creating and distributing the national wealth and restructuring and reforming the social-cultural and economic fabrics of our nation to suit us. Ours is a collective burden and responsibility sharing so that we can also collectively share our blessings. This solution to the Liberian dilemma has not come to us thoughtlessly, but in response to the frequent questions Liberians continue to ask themselves repeatedly:

  • Are we and our nation cursed?
  • Who are we and why are we where we are?
  • How do we move away from this rot in which we are stuck?

 

  • What is government if not a bunch of sycophants, hypocrites and thieves that allow public officials to loot public coffers with impunity while disregarding public confidence in the process?
  • Why do we prefer to perpetrate our people’s suffering and yet enjoy at their expense?
  • For how much longer must we remain a poor, dependent and desperate country?
  • Can government be different—more responsive to the people and less reflective on self?
  • Who should govern the Liberian people and why?
  • How should government govern so that it fulfills not only its own priorities, but also the vision of the nation’s sole Architect?
  • Why should we have any confidence in our government?
  • How has the first on the continent become the last and lost its cutting edge?
  • What must we do to restore Liberia from its fallen state? Is there any hope for Liberia and its people?

 

These are the questions, and these are the mean reasons we are where we are, and their correct answers are not destined for rhetorical or mere intellectual stimulation. If Liberia must rise as its founding fathers’ vision, if it must deliver the hopes they wished their nation would deliver to its people and if today’s Liberia must bequeath any legacy of significance to its successors, then, today, here and now, we must act together to determine that legacy. If we must no longer remain a crippled beggar nation among the world’s nations and if “All hail, Liberia hail!” is to have any significance, then, today, we must rise up and determine the way and means that will make this desire a reality. If Liberia must live and not merely survive, and if it must live abundantly with what its Creator has provided, then, we must learn to lead our nation and people by firstly becoming good stewards.

 

We want to help transform a land that savagely devours its inhabitants into one that
develops them and gives them hope for their future. We desire to raise restorers in the
family, in education, in industry, in agriculture, in commerce, in health, in media, in the judiciary and in the public space without necessarily being the ones to lead. And if this nation of ours will rise, and if it will rise to the joy of its Creator, then its restorers must rouse and arm themselves with the highest standards and character that accords with His precepts. And if Liberia must also live abundantly, its restorers must abandon themselves to watchful, not wasteful living and seek the abundance, not the abhorrence of their fellow citizens. To this urgent call and noble cause we invite all to stand with us in diligently seeking the restoration of our hurting nation from further ruination. To that effect, and for the sincere love of humanity and the One and Only who is above all, we humbly advance the following framework and principles of governance that we believe will lead to the restoration of Liberia.